The short stay that we wanted.

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We’ve never taken Liam home from the hospital while he was still “sick”. 40 day stays seldom end with discharge if there is still the hint of infection, so we were slightly surprised when the word to break free came on Thursday afternoon. Not that we complained or did anything to stop it mind you, but slightly surprised nonetheless. The attending doc who discharged us was right when she commented that once the seizure that brought us into the ER had been stabilized the remaining symptoms were not enough to keep us in the PICU. Since heading upstairs to the non-ICU floors is not really an option for Liam it was only logical to send us home. I believe her direct quote was actually “there’s nothing here that you guys couldn’t handle.” She’s gotten to know us pretty well over the years.

Still, I’d be lying if I didn’t say that these last 24 hours hadn’t been tinted with more than the usual amounts of stress and worry. Barely 30 hours after getting home Karin and I still find ourselves waiting for the other shoe to drop, for one of these mild symptoms to send us bouncing back into the PICU just like we have so many times after a hospital stay.

******

I blog more when Liam is in the hospital. It’s a great way to let family and friends know what’s going on but it also gives me something to talk about. Something in the present because lately I’ve been focusing more on our past.

A few months ago I told you about a presentation I was writing about our story. I’m happy to report that it went well. Very well in fact and I have been asked to do another. Tuesday I will be the keynote speaker for the Women & Infants Hospital Schwartz Center Rounds. (You can read more about Schwartz Center Rounds here). After speaking for 15-20 minutes (no small feat in itself, that first presentation I went on and on for almost 45!) Karin and Liam and I, with the aide of a facilitator, will answer questions as part of a panel discussion for an audience of doctors and nurses, who will receive continuing education credits, along with other caregivers and hospital staff.

It’s kind of a big deal.

It’s why I have been focusing so much on our past. On Liam’s time in the NiCU. On the impact that nurses and case managers, and therapists have had on our family and its development.

It’s why along with meditations on our past there have arisen very new and exciting thoughts about our future. About my future. It may have taken me 35 years but I think I may have finally figured out what I want to be when I grow up and that it has something to do with writing and speaking about patient advocacy.

And it’s why I shouldn’t be blogging any of this right now. It’s all time that I should be working on my speech.

Thank you all for the thoughts, prayers, and well wishes this week when you heard that Liam had been hospitalized. Getting all of those tweets and comments and emails is another reason why I blog more when Liam is in the hospital. It’s nice to know there are so many people out there who care about us. It means more than you all know.

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3 comments

  1. I’m so glad for you all — on all fronts. I’m particularly excited that things are moving forward on the public speaking/advocacy fronts and know, from the work that I’ve done in that area, that it will change your life positively!

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